NASA Discovers New Life Form. No, It's Not an Alien

Share
Tweet
Pin It
Share
Tweet
Pin It



NASA had everyone buzzing when it said that it would be holding a press conference today that "will impact the search for evidence of extraterrestrial life." What's the big news? Well, the government agency has discovered a new microbe that has a different DNA from all other life forms on Earth.

Before you get freaked out about I Am Number Four becoming a reality, you should know that what was discovered is not an alien. Some may be calling it an "alien" life form, but that's just because it's an unfamiliar organism.

The new bacteria was found in Mono Lake, Calif. (not another planet or anything), and has a DNA makeup that includes arsenic. Bio flashback: All organisms on our planet are made up of carbon, hyrdogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur. This new microbe actually exchanges phosphorus for arsenic, which would otherwise be poisonous to human beings and other life forms.

Why is this so exciting? "This idea that it's possible to substitute things changes the way we look at living things, and changes the way we think about what's possible," Bill Nye the Science Guy said on CNN today.

"This is an adaptaption of life as we know it, doing something that we didn't think it could," astronomer Jill Tarter said on the news channel. "[It's] just an indication that life is far more adaptable than perhaps we give it credit for. But what this does, perhaps, is expand the habitable real estate out there. It's really intriguing."

What do you think of NASA's new discovery? Are you excited about the possibilities or scared by them? Were you kind of hoping the scientists discovered aliens? %Poll-56405%

MORE CELEB SCOOPS

Show Comments
Join Our Newsletter
Stay fetch. Sign up for The Cray, our daily roundup of all things buzzworthy. From Kylie Jenner's trendsetting style (btw, puberty goals AF) to life-changing tech news (tweeting an emoji to order a pizza #YES), The Cray is all you need to impress the squad.
Privacy Terms