Mo'Ne Davis Forgives Twitter Bully Who Called the 13-Year-Old a Slut

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Social media is capable of connecting people and spreading positive messages, so it's disheartening that we still hear stories about online bullying and harassment. Take the case of Mo'Ne Davis, for example. After it was announced that the talented Little Leaguer (who "throws 'like a girl' at 70 miles an hour") has a Disney Channel film in the works, Joey Casselberry, a baseball player at Bloomsburg University decided to go and be a jerk about it on Twitter - and what happened next should be a warning for anyone who uses the platform.

"Disney is making a movie about Mo'Ne Davis? What a joke! That slut got rocked by Nevada," tweeted the first baseman about the 13-year-old Davis' recent loss. Joey clearly thought the joke (the one in which he calls someone still in the Little League a slut) was hysterical, but Bloomsburg University didn't agree: he was dismissed from his baseball team over the tweet.

Luckily for Joey, he has one person on his side - Mo'Ne. Yep, because she is 150 percent more mature than the college junior, she actually contacted the university and asked them to give Joey another chance on the team. According to the university, they are standing firm on their decision, but will review the case as they do with all disciplinary issues. Joey issued an apology on Twitter before deactivating his account, asking for forgiveness and stating that he is a huge fan of the inspirational Davis.

Look, I get it - sometimes we tweet without thinking. Sometimes what we think our jokes are misconstrued as hate. But I'm not so sure that was the case here. I think that Joey knew what he was tweeting and he just didn't really care. He thought - like so many people think - that you can say whatever you want about whoever you want on Twitter and the world won't think anything of it, or, worse, give you silent validation in the form of a "Like" or "Favorite." This idea that we have somewhat of a separation of responsibility for our words when they are put online is something we all need to shift our attitudes on. Spewing hateful speech online is no different than doing so in person - it's wrong and tends to have a bigger impact on the victim than we can ever realize.

We live in a world where people have killed themselves over being bullied on the internet. Why would we ever want to be a part of that problem? Joey may have tweeted his nasty comment as a joke, but as a college student he should know by now that his words have power. If he didn't, well, his break from the baseball team should hopefully school him.

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