Fashion Week Could Look Very Different In a Few Seasons - Here's Why

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Every fashionista who's ever obsessively checked Vogue Runway (formerly Style.com, R.I.P.) during Fashion Week or rushed home to catch the live stream of her favorite designer's show knows that an invitation to an exclusive show at fashion week is basically our ultimate #goals - and as it turns out, our fashion week dreams could soon become a reality.

Women's Wear Daily is reporting that in the coming seasons, fashion week may work a little differently. The Council of Fashion Designers of America, lead by Diane Von Furstenberg, has recently proposed an idea that would turn the twice-a-year, super exclusive fashion weeks into events for the consumer instead of just being industry exclusive.

Instead of showing clothes six months in advance like in the current system, fashion shows would happen when the clothes hit stores, and would be open to the consumers, who could immediately purchase the clothes they see on the runway. Buyers, editors and other members of the industry would view the clothes ahead of time via private appointments.
Kanye West Yeezy Season 2 - RunwayMany designers and other members of the industry have long been calling fashion week a "broken system," and this plan seeks to take some of the immense pressure off designers as well as prevent the inevitable fast fashion copies that hit stores immediately after the original designer's clothes are shown.

The plan comes at a time when many major designers, such as Rebecca Minkoff, are already opting to show their lines at fashion week at the same time they hit stores. Proenza Schouler has also announced that it will not release images of its pre-fall collection until April when the clothes actually hit stores.

While this new makeover of fashion week sounds interesting AF (we're all about stopping knockoffs once and for all!), we do have a few questions: Will it really be less stressful for designers to have to coordinate private collection viewings in addition to a buzzworthy, Instagram-able runway show? Who exactly are these "consumers" that the CFDA is referencing? If it's only people who can afford to buy the clothes, does this plan really make fashion week less exclusive at all? What does this mean for celebs that are currently front-row regulars?

All valid questions. It will be interesting to see how the CFDA handles fashion week in the future - and who knows? Maybe by the spring 2016 shows, we could be watching our fave designer's clothes come down the runway IRL - we can only hope!

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